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Te Awanga Trail

From Haumoana [yesterdays trail]  the journey follows the coast to Clifton.  On the way is the little village of Te Awanga.  This used to be the place to buy a house if you couldn't afford Hastings.  That has completely reversed.  Te Awanga is now very fashionable and expensive.





















Te Awanga is next to a coast.  The view North towards Napier is somewhat cloudy and looks in part like rain in the hills.  Here in Te Awanga we have DRYYYYYYYYYY!





























If you have a section with a view of the coast, you build upwards.....  and surround your house with shading palm trees.  In the middle of Hastings NO-ONE would build like this.


































It was once a boat but is now just a flagpole!
































The trail is still just limestome.
























Te Awanga point.  There's not much of a surf today.



































Ducks!  Lots of them.  This is the second  of three large groups I encountered.  They love water and lagoons have water.

























The lagoon is not far from the sea, and under the rainclouds in the distance is Napier.

























Te Awanga has lots of beautifully cared for little cottages.  This one looks so pretty.



























The neighbours "cottage".  I like the red on the garage.  It imitates the vine on the neighbours veranda.


































This time of year the Pohutukawa is just finishing flowering.  There are some magnificent trees in Te Awanga.  All of them brought in from further north.






























This appears to be waste land.  It shows fennel plants that have been eaten by cows.  They have a smell that is not unlike licorice.  The grass is very dry and perfect for cows who need the roughage of older grass.  They don't thrive on grass that is young and sugary.  When the grass is extremely lush cows have been known to blow up like balloons.  It is called bloat.  In extreme cases farmers have been known to use a pocket knife to save a valuable cows life.































Ducks love water and there is still some in this little stream.


















  
This shady stream reminds me of the days of my childhood swimming in the Maratoto stream near Hikutaia.  [Hikutaia is a place not far from Paeroa in the Waikato]































Having cows around a swimming hole is definitely a NO-NO.  S*** in the water is not nice.  However the stream looks lovely here.



























Hidden amongst the trees is a house.  There are definitely some wonderful places to live in Hawkes Bay.



























This station doesn't have trains.  It has sheep.  Even today it still has sheep but it also has tourists that visit to watch shearing.  The sheep are  shorn and the tourists "fleeced".  Only I don't think they feel fleeced.  Where else can you watch a few sheep shorn for a few dollars.  In fact it is a really great addition to the sheep stations traditional business.  And a great asset to Te Awanga.
























It is a famous station and is more than a century old.


























Old Oak trees line the road to the homestead.  They also had the popular trees for shelter in NZ. .....  GUMS.










































Here it is.  Another Aussie import.  A GUM TREE.  Just in case you get the wrong impression.  I like gum trees.  They burn well and turn well.  Their wood has some very beautiful colors.


















































 
The Pohutukawa also has beautiful wood.  It burns well and turns well. Some thoughtful person has planted a whole row of them.  Well DONE! I doubt if many people will get to turn this wood.























































The road was washed away so another had to be built.  However there were issues over the need to reclaim part of  Clifton Station to build it.  The road is not part of the national or local network of roads.  Its just a private accessway to the campsite.  So the insurance company is no doubt refusing to insure it any more.  However it looks spectacular.
































The road leads on to the campsite.  It seems that it is also smaller than it used to be.... a little worn away!


























Overlooking the road is a large stately home.  It is the original homestead of Clifton Station.  These homes often have wonderful furniture and wooden paneling.  It is rare to find an old home in a good state of repair, as the costs of upkeep and maintenance is mind-numbing.  And often the well repaired ones get burnt down.  That makes the survivors even rarer.

I hope you found this tour of Te Awanga and Clifton interesting.  I enjoy my outings and I am learning what a beautiful place it is that I live in.  

Cheers Chris the Pipemaker.


1 Comment to Te Awanga Trail:

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Pocket Knife Online on Monday, 2 May 2016 10:53 p.m.
This information is really useful for us thanks for sharing.
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