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Jubilee Street [#2]

More fotos of Jubilee Street.

























































Just next to the flax bushes there is a Banksia tree.  The tree is a native of Australia and is named after Joseph Banks, the botanist on Cooks voyage to Australia and New Zealand.



























































 
This is the palm tree from Jerusalem.  I wonder if ist is called the Jerusalem Palm?  The shape is half way between a leaf on a stem, and the "blade of grass" leaf of the flax bush.










































This is a particularly magnificent palm  The leaves are much fresher than the one in the background.

















































One of the trees I am very fond of is the Totara.  A number of flutes and pipes that I have made are from new Totara.  [Old Totara from old fence posts is much darker and softer.]
















































This magnificent Totara stands at the very end of Jubilee Street.  It guards the entrance to the orchard that lies beyond the end of the street.














































It has a massive trunk.


































The leaves are flat needles.  The points are strong enough to be rather prickly to handle.  We had a ottar tree in the grounds of the home in Wharepoa where I grew up.  It was the tree I only ever climbed once.  It was just too prickly.








































December is not the best month for roses.  The spring bloom is over.  Yet a keen "deadheaded can keep there flowers coming.  The owner of this bush must be one of those for the flower s a beauty.

















































On the same bush you can see new growth and fresh buds.









































This is a very large version of a shrub called Lophomyrtus.  It is usually much smaller.  The wood is great for turning.  If you leave it out in the rain as I did, you get the most wonderful "salting".  If you are not sure what that is, try wikipedia.  I shows some wonderful examples.

























The leaves of the Lophomyrtus are easily recognisable by their dimples and tinge of red.

































   
New rose shoots in front of maple leaves.
































I do not know th name of this bush, but I love the flowers with their rose like form and wonderful orange colour.









































The colour is indeed quite a deep orange... almost red.


























The colour of these roses is almost gone but they are still beautiful.















































From aa distance it is hard to distinguish between flowers or leaves.  They are leaves.  But nevertheless, very pretty.























































An uncared-for Iris standing beside someones driveway.  So beautiful.

My exploration fo my own street proved that there are many little gems to be discovered.I hope some of you may be moved to go and do something similar with your streets.

Cheers Chris The Pipemaker.



1 Comment to Jubilee Street [#2]:

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top celebrity jackets on Thursday, 4 January 2018 4:52 p.m.
This jubileeflutesandpipes site has been sharing about player, mostly young people can learn to play. Wonderful learning topics and tips for learned the encouragement and helps me for new pipes,keep it up.
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