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Treelinoe Gardens

On the way to Taupo there is a side-road advertising the directions to Treelinoe Gardens.  These gardens have going for perhaps fifty years.  I visited them once nearly forty years ago.  They were beautifully set out.  My return found them much changed.  All the trees were fully grown.  That meant they were so high the view was quite obscured.  The previous owner, who had dedicated himself to the creation and extension of the gardens, had died.  The new owner had some idea of the value of the gardens, but something was missing.  I viewed the present park with a feeling of some sadness.

Here are some Lawsonianas.  They are magnificent.  Rarely do they grow to great size.  Only in isolated mountain areas do they get so big.

This tree in the centre is some kind of tree like the Rubinia, or perhaps an Acacia, has broad leaves, but the angle from which we see them makes them look rather like needles.

Fotografing a redwood is nearly impossible, but I did get what impressed me.  The big, thick, rough bark.

You can get an idea of how the sheep farmers have shaped the landscape from this foto.  There are relatively few big trees.  There is forest on the right hand side.  Radiata pine forest.
A few Macrocarpas make a hedge on the left.  Treelinoe is covered in tall trees of many different kinds.  Quite a contrast.

The bark of this tree resembles that of the Redwood.  It is a very different tree.  It is a Eucalyptus from Australia.

In amongst the trees I found a mini Stonehenge.

The magnificent fir tree at the left end of "Stonehenge"  caught my eye.  Look at the tilt of the ends of the branches.  From that a forester can tell the type of fir tree.

This big block of limestone has character.  It is not from the farm here.   But it is local to Hawkes Bay.

I took this foto because of the beautiful green leaves in the sunlight above.  When I came to edit the foto, I saw something else.  The great impression the foto gives of the tallness of the trees.

This foto illustrates better, the light green leaves at the top of the canopy.

In the blog on the "Holt Forest"  I had fotos of good examples of this type of tree.  This is a Kauri tree.  It is not normally found in this part of New Zealand, but once planted, it seems to thrive.  Kauris in the natural habitat are being attacked by a fungus called "Kauri die-back disease".  It is a serious threat to the biggest Kauris in New Zealand.

There is a whole grave of Kauris.  The lower branches "self  prune", that means they fall off once the tree has grown to a good size.

What can give more joy than a young Rimu with its lovely cascading form.

This Rimu is older and "More Serious".  The full grown trees are dark and serious.  Like the Kauris, Rimus don't keep their lower branches.  Rimu wood is one of my favourites, it is truly beautiful wood.  Only drawback is the the wood is slightly toxic and makes me sneeze when I am turning it or sanding it.  I have to wear a mask.

I hope these fotos don't show the feeling of sadness I had when at Treelinoe.  The sadness was for the contrast with what I remembered.  Treelinoe is a magnificent arboretum park.

Cheers Chris the Pipemaker.

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